New Zealand Artist: Rita Angus

Rita Angus, Cass, 1936
Rita Angus, Cass, 1936

Rita Angus (1908-1970) is well-known in New Zealand for her clear, sharp-edged portraits and landscapes, including ‘Cass’, which was voted New Zealand’s favourite painting in a 2006 TV show. Rather than talking about her, I’m just going to show you a few of her paintings. Continue reading “New Zealand Artist: Rita Angus”

New Zealand Artist: Colin McCahon

Colin McCahon (1919-1987) is one of New Zealand’s most prominent artists. He was one of a group of artists who introduced Modernism into New Zealand, and is perhaps best-known for his large-scale works, often in muted, earthy tones or shades of black, white, and grey, which layered text over a background image.

McCahon Urewera Mural 1976
Colin McCahon, Urewera Mural, 1976

Continue reading “New Zealand Artist: Colin McCahon”

Local Culture: Artists Open Studios 2017

 

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Troll head sculpture by Raymond de la Haye, viewed in his sculpture garden in upper Aramoho
The last weekend in March and the first weekend in April saw the return of Artists Open Studios, a highlight of the Whanganui artistic calendar during which local artists open their studios to members of the public. This year almost eighty studios and over a hundred artists participated, so I was rather glad when the Significant Other (who hadn’t ‘done’ AOS before) went through the artists catalogue and highlighted a dozen studios which particularly interested him, as it spared me the agony of trying to decide. I did, however, insist on a visit to the studio of my favourite local artist, Tina Drayton. Continue reading “Local Culture: Artists Open Studios 2017”

Paintings You Should Know: ‘Impression: Sunrise’ by Claude Monet, 1872

10 Monet Impression Sunrise 1872
Monet, ‘Impression: Sunrise’, 1872

Although the term ‘Impressionism’ was already in use to describe a style of painting emerging in France in the latter part of the 1800s it was Monet’s use of the word as an off-the-cuff name for this 1872 work (in French, ‘Impression, soleil levant’) which led to its formal and widespread adoption. Continue reading “Paintings You Should Know: ‘Impression: Sunrise’ by Claude Monet, 1872”

Paintings You Should Know: Caravaggio’s ‘The Death of the Virgin’, C.1602-06

2 Caravaggio Death of the Virgin 1604to06
Caravaggio, The Death of the Virgin, 1604-06

The interesting thing about this painting, beyond anything to do with the composition or the skill of the artist, is the fact that it was, and for some arguably still is, controversial to the point of outright offensiveness. Continue reading “Paintings You Should Know: Caravaggio’s ‘The Death of the Virgin’, C.1602-06”

Recommended Read: Female Artists in History (Facebook page)

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Into the Light-14, by Marion van Nieuwpoort, 2007. Love the contrast in this painting: stillness and movement, washed-out neutrals and bright pinks.

I’ve been following the Female Artists in History Facebook page for several months now, and wanted to share it here for anyone who might be interested. Curated by two women, Christa Zaat and Carel Ronk, the page presents works, primarily paintings, by women artists along with brief biographies.

And it turns out there are a lot of them. All the well-known names are there: Artemisia Gentileschi, Frida Kahlo, Mary Cassatt, Georgia O’Keefe… but there are also heaps of names that I (and probably you) have never come across before. Continue reading “Recommended Read: Female Artists in History (Facebook page)”

Ta Moko: a contemporary Maori perspective

heeni-hirini-and-child-1878
Heeni Hirini and child, 1878.

Something a little different today: follow this link to a recent article by New Zealand’s NewsHub on Ta Moko (facial tattooing), including a brief history of ta moko in New Zealand and a video where Maori people with ta moko discuss the significance of the art in contemporary Maori culture and their own lives.

Originally posted to mark Waitangi Day 2017 (the New Zealand public holiday celebrated annually on February 6th to mark the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi between representatives of Maori tribes and the British crown), it’s definitely well worth checking out.

Let me know what you thought.

Summer Holidays #4: Exploring Auckland Art Gallery

Auckland Art Gallery.pngAlthough I had gone to the Auckland Art Gallery specifically to see the Lindauer portraits it seemed rather a shame to leave without checking out some of the other exhibitions, so we didn’t. In this post I’ll be recording a few brief impressions of the other exhibitions we saw at the Gallery.

After our experience with modern sculpture at Brick Bay, we decided to largely eschew the modern art exhibitions and focus our attention on primarily on art from before the start of the 20th century. Fortunately, the Auckland Art Gallery is large and has numerous exhibitions to choose from. Continue reading “Summer Holidays #4: Exploring Auckland Art Gallery”